Art meets design at this photographic exhibition by Rohit Chawla – ThePrint

A woman stands next to her portrait at the exhibition | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint

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Chhatarpur: Fine art photos of Rohit Chawla adorn the spaces of a New Delhi lifestyle showroom.

The exhibition – The eye of design – hosted by Spin features photographs taken by Chawla over the years, including images he clicked on when he started his career in 1981.

The exhibition was inaugurated on Friday by the French Ambassador Emmanuel Lenain. There was a discussion of the film versus digital camera, followed by a discussion with Raghu Rai on contemporary photographic practices. Rai, who is known for street photography and documentary photography, explained that contemporary photographers have neither the time nor the patience, they want everything to be fast, just like “fast food”.

A woman looks at a photo of Rohit Chawla's boudoir at the event |  Photo: Manisha World |  The imprint
A woman looks at a photo of Rohit Chawla at the event | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint

Chawla started photography at the age of 17 for a living. “It was not a creative vocation,” he said. But gradually he started to like the process. He started his career as an advertising photographer in 1987, but “I got too big for advertising”.

His journey as a Fine Arts photographer began in 2013 when he started working with India today. “This is where I accepted editorial photography in all its glory, and it was the best days of my life. TO India today I bought a certain advertising sensitivity to photojournalism, it’s always a strange encounter.

One of the photographs clicked between the missions |  Photo: Manisha World |  The imprint
One of the photographs clicked between the missions | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint
A woman loves photos |  Photo: Manisha World |  The imprint
A woman looks at the photos at the exhibition | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint

Early in her career, Chawla started out with street photography, but now her photos are more about design and subtraction. He said that now his photos have a different vocation. “I believe more and more in staged images, I am for the images that come from my head and I create them. “

The model in the photos is posing.  Most of the women Chawla photographed are non-professional models |  Photo: Manisha World |  The imprint
Most of the women Chawla photographed are non-professional models | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint
There are various photos of boudoir in the exhibition |  Photo: Manisha World |  The imprint
There are various photos of boudoir in the exhibition | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint

The exhibition is unique in its own way, as Chawla describes it as “design within design”.

“I was tired of doing the exhibition in the galleries, where the same 200 people went. Most of them did not even return to the exhibition. I wanted to be interactive this time. I think my experiment is working.

At Spin, Chawla highlighted how photographs complement lifestyle design.

“My images are all about design and they’re on display in one of India’s biggest design stores, it’s a beautiful fusion,” he said.

A seated woman poses for a photo with one of the photographs |  Photo: Manisha World |  The imprint
A woman poses for a photo with one of the photographs | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint

Chawla’s images have patterns, lines, and shadows. “I love the interplay of straight lines and graphic spaces,” he said. However, none of the images have a caption. All of them have been left for viewers to find meaning.

Chawla is of the opinion that the pictures don’t need captions, they are timeless, the pictures should speak for themselves. Unlike news images, Fine Arts is open to interpretation, he says.

Rohit Chawla posing with one of her best photos |  Photo: Manisha World |  The imprint
Rohit Chawla poses with one of her favorite photos | Photo: Manisha World | The imprint

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